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The Meaning of Good Governance

The Meaning of Good Governance 1200 628 Michelle Boyer

Good governance. What does it mean anyway?

Governance means:

  • Responsible use of assets and funds.
  • Ensuring the group/organization is fulfilling its mission.
  • Openly communicating with others and listening to others at all levels of the organization.
  • Accurate recordkeeping for the benefit of the organization and those we serve.
  • Maintaining good legal standing through compliance with IRS section 501(c)(3) requirements.
  • Serving as a good role model: In the Vincentian world this also includes embracing servant leadership.

Governance does NOT mean:

  • The leader cannot share responsibilities.
  • Numbers are more important than people.
  • Opinions of others do not matter.
  • Turning the organization/group into something distant from its mission.

Basically, good governance means good leadership. It means taking good care of the Society; it means taking good care of those we serve. It means taking care of each other, encouraging the spiritual growth of all members and friendship among members, and person-to-person service. It means serving with integrity, accountability and in a trustworthy manner. Taking advantage of ongoing learning opportunities and identifying helpful collaborations can help Vincentian leaders govern and lead with great effectiveness and joy.

St. Vincent de Paul once said, “There is great charity – but it is badly organized.” Let us be inspired by St. Vincent’s good governance and leadership and allow the generosity of others to be put to good use.

Do People Trust You? Advice for Building Trust and Inspiring Confidence

Do People Trust You? Advice for Building Trust and Inspiring Confidence 1200 628 Michelle Boyer

One afternoon as I was passing through the airport on my way home, I ran into a colleague of mine, Stephen M. R. Covey, the author of the book “The Speed of Trust.” We stopped and exchanged a few pleasantries. I could tell that he needed to get through security, so I bid him safe travels.

As he was hurrying away, I yelled after him, “I know something faster than the speed of trust.”  He yelled back, “What’s that?” I responded, “Distrust.” He laughed as he hurried away and responded, “You’re probably right.”

Think about it for a minute. Some people will trust you from the beginning of your relationship without having any experience with you. Others won’t trust you no matter what you do; you really have to work to earn their trust. Still others begin their relationship with you in a neutral position. They will wait to see what you say and do before they trust you.

No matter where the trust in any relationship begins, what we know for sure is that it doesn’t take much negative behavior to diminish the trust that people have in you.

Here are a few tips to help you assess your trustworthiness and to increase the confidence people have in you.

  • Do you walk the talk?

There is probably nothing that erodes trust quicker than saying one thing and then doing another. The first time this happens, people will take a closer look at your behavior. But if it happens repeatedly, people will come to distrust you and not believe anything that you say. You will appear as if you just say what you think people want to hear. This seeming lack of credibility will cause people to question your intentions and can cause lasting damage to your relationships.

What to do? Stop and think about what you are about to say, or what purpose your message needs to convey, and then say what you truly mean. Being deliberate and intentional about your message will increase alignment between your message and your behavior.

  • Do you keep your commitments?

This is closely associated with the previous question.  Sometimes we make commitments and things change. When this happens, it is important to acknowledge your commitment and make necessary adjustments. If you let another commitment take priority over a previous commitment and don’t manage that dynamic, then people will learn to not take you seriously and may not keep their commitments to you.

What to do? Keep a calendar of your commitments and manage them. If something changes, then be sure to communicate those changes and make new arrangements as soon as you can.  Don’t blow people off or forget to keep your commitments. Using some kind of planning or calendaring software will help you to keep your commitments while strengthening the trust that others give you.

  • Is your behavior consistent?

If you have wild mood swings and are unpredictable, your erratic behavior will lead people to distrust you. In one of my first corporate positions, I had a manager who had broad swings in behavior and mood. You never knew if your performance would be celebrated or trashed in front of others. The first person to arrive in the morning would test the waters and then alert everyone at the coffee machine if we could engage with our manager or should make ourselves scarce that day.  Consequently, few people felt that they could fully trust him.

What to do?  Notice if people approach you and ask for your input or support on their work.  If you are not approached by others, perhaps you could find a respected colleague and ask for feedback about how you come across.  If someone will be honest with you, listen to what they have to say.  Ask for examples and thank them when they finish.  If you find that people are unsure about how to approach you, strategize some ways to manage your behavior and mood so it is more predictable and consistent.

  • Do you misrepresent the truth?

This happens more frequently than people would like to admit.  People are often afraid to speak up and tell it like it is, fearing the perceived negative consequences that could occur. This perception will have a negative impact on behavior. When people don’t keep their commitments or meet expectations of performance, then they feel forced to cover their mistakes to justify their behavior. This leads others to avoid interacting with those individuals and to distrust the stories they offer as excuses for their behavior.

What to do? If you find yourself misrepresenting or exaggerating situations, then you are at risk to not be taken seriously and are setting yourself up to be distrusted.  Stretching the truth and making excuses can become a habitual response. If this is often your first reaction, recognizing your tendency to do it, determining your motivation behind this response and correcting it will go a long way toward building trust.

  • Do you withhold information from others?

This is usually a power play of sorts where people make themselves the gatekeeper of what others need to know to do their work. Such behavior leads to frustration on the part of others and also can lead to people not sharing information that you may need. Withholding information also leads people to figure out how to work around you so they have as little interaction as possible.

Sometimes, for legal reasons, you may not be able to tell others what you know. When this is the case and others press you for information, you simply need to tell people that you can’t tell them about a certain situation because of legal ramifications to you and your company.

What to do? Ask people what information they need and, specifically, identify deadlines. Look to offer support and address others’ needs and concerns to increase the success of those that rely on you in some way. When people ask you for information that you can’t share, simply manage the situation and tell them that. They will understand.

  • Do you gossip about others?

Nothing will erode trust quicker than talking about others behind their back. Unfortunately, people often talk about others rather than to others. When you gossip, your behavior tells your listener that if you would talk about someone else, then you would also talk about them. Although they may listen to you and engage in the gossip, they won’t trust you. This kind of behavior ruins relationships, destroys company culture and creates emotional drama that everyone would rather avoid.

What to do?  Stop it. If you have an issue with someone, talk to the person you need to talk to and avoid the rumor mill that puts people on negative alert but never solves the problem. Otherwise you will just get more of the same – poor results and no trust.

  • Do you throw others under the bus?

This behavior usually takes place when someone is trying to avoid responsibility or accountability for the results that were created. Sometimes, when others have not kept their commitments to you, their behavior has a direct negative effect on your results. When this is the case, ask yourself, “Did I manage the situation in such a way that kept them from being successful? Did I do my part to help them to be successful and to achieve the desired results?” Sometimes we become so busy and have so many things to do that we fail to manage a person or a situation in an optimal fashion.

What to do? Be responsible and take accountability for managing others, facilitating activities that will produce the desired results. When things don’t go as planned, examine your part in the process and accept ownership. Doing so will go a long way to creating and strengthening trust.

  • Do you keep confidences?

Someone once told me that there is no such thing as a secret until the person you told it to is dead. If someone shares something sensitive and important with you in confidence, unless there is a specific and legal reason not to, you should keep those things confidential. If you are going to share something important with another person, you should assume that sometime or somewhere what you share will be shared with someone else.

  • Are you supportive of others?

Nothing increases trust like being sincerely interested in and supportive of others and their efforts. If you are a leader and you frequently ask people what they need from you and how you can help and support them, they will feel the satisfaction that comes in knowing someone cares about them and their success. That care and concern will translate into increased trust.

What to do?  Check in frequently and offer support. This will afford you the opportunity to get to know them, how they are doing and what you can help them with.  Making interpersonal connections such as these will improve their work and their performance.

Our interactions with others serve either to build trust within our relationships or call it into question. Recognize that what you do and say is the first step in building and strengthening trust. As you consciously work to increase others’ confidence in you, your interactions will improve and you will achieve greater results. And, you’ll never have to worry about the speed of distrust.

Connect with John R. Stoker on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.

How To Avoid Confusion With Clear Communication

How To Avoid Confusion With Clear Communication 1200 628 Michelle Boyer

Under-communication is a consistent problem in nearly every business. You can solve that by taking ownership of the communication happening around you.

I’ve worked with more than my share of poor communicators over the years. One was a boss who rarely shared information and never in a timely way. My office happened to be in a different building than his, so getting to our weekly one-on-one meeting took a little effort. Each week, I prepared a status report on my major projects, developed a list of answers I needed to make progress, and drove to the office in time for the meeting.

I can’t tell you how many times I was greeted by his assistant with a pained expression. “I’m so sorry,” she’d say. “He had to step out.” Not only did he cancel most of our meetings, but he did so without notice.

When we did meet, he provided little or no clarity. And he dodged most of my questions with “I’ll have to get back to you on that.” It was maddening!

Most under-communication is inadvertent. People are simply unaware of the gap between what’s in their mind and what’s in yours, and you suffer from that same lack of awareness. In fact, a team of researchers writing in the Journal of Political Economy labeled this phenomenon “the curse of knowledge.” It means that when you know something, it’s very hard to remember that other people don’t.

Fortunately, the solution is remarkably simple. All you have to do is step up and take responsibility for all the communication that comes from you or to you. Here’s how:

Determine To Be The Solution
Most of us are not fully aware of our own part in the communication quagmire. We may expect others to do all the work of conveying information. The first step in communicating clearly is to determine to be the solution, not the problem. Are you ready to champion clear communication in your workplace?

Externalize Your Thinking
The curse of knowledge affects everyone, including you. As a result, we don’t communicate or don’t communicate enough. Be aware of the gap between your understanding and that of your team. Stop assuming that people know what’s important or what needs to be done. Get your thoughts out of your head where others can read or hear them.

Push For Clarity
Before you compose your message (or say it out loud), ask yourself, “How can I set the other person up for success?” Before you hit send, reread the communication to be sure it’s clear. Would you know exactly what you meant? Clarity is vital for communication. Sometimes that will mean pushing others for clarity. Remember, they also suffer from the curse of knowledge and may have a tendency to omit information or use ambiguous language. Gently ask them to make their meaning clear.

Confirm Understanding
Communication hasn’t really happened until the other person not only receives your words but also understands them. You can request a “read receipt” when you send a message, but you also need to get an “understand receipt.” You can do that with questions like “Is anything unclear about that?” or “What do you understand based on what I’ve said?”

Over-Communicate
Actually, you can’t over-communicate. Or at least it is pretty hard to do.  People are busy and distracted. They forget things they should remember – things they want to remember. Communication is not a one-and-done event. Communicate again. And again.

What would it be like to come to work in a place where you never had to go on a deep dive for the information you need to do your job? How would it change the culture of your office if everyone was clear, direct and intentional in their communication? Why not take responsibility for making that happen and find out?

10-07-2021 Questions and Answers

10-07-2021 Questions and Answers 1200 628 Michelle Boyer

Q:  What are the consequences if a Conference refuses to make Home Visits?

A:  No consequences are imposed. However, as Council leaders we must continue to encourage and advocate the fact that Home Visits are what makes us unique and unlike other charitable organizations. The Rule, Part III, Statute 8 clearly states: “Visits to those in need should be made in their environment.” We recognize that personal safety, COVID and other local factors may make such visits at times difficult to achieve. There are also some Conferences organized as Special Works Conferences. Leaders are asked to do their best to help members grow in spirituality though the experience of our basic Home Visit, conducted as “close to the customer” as possible.

Q:  Is the Society okay with Conferences using their Archdiocese parishes revolving accounts (PRF) instead of savings accounts?

A:  PRF accounts are acceptable if they are not comingled with parish funds, SVdP has sole access to the funds, and the funds are accessible immediately. These sort of agreements are rare; often the Pastor has funds access. Therefore such accounts must be viewed with great scrutiny and backed up with strong documentation.

Spanish Questions & Answers

P: ¿Cuáles son las consecuencias si una Conferencia se niega a realizar visitas domiciliarias?

R:  No se imponen consecuencias. Sin embargo, como líderes del Consejo, debemos continuar alentando y defendiendo el hecho de que las visitas domiciliarias son lo que nos hace únicos y diferentes a otras organizaciones caritativas. La Regla, Parte III, Estatuto 8 establece claramente: “Las visitas a aquellos en necesidad deben hacerse en su ambiente.” Reconocemos que la seguridad personal, el COVID y otros factores locales pueden hacer que, en ocasiones, estas visitas sean difíciles de lograr. También hay algunas Conferencias organizadas como Conferencias de Trabajos Especiales. Se pide a los líderes que hagan todo lo posible para ayudar a los miembros a crecer en espiritualidad a través de la experiencia de nuestra visita domiciliaria básica, realizada lo más “cerca del cliente” como sea posible.

P: ¿Está la Sociedad de acuerdo con que las Conferencias utilicen las cuentas rotativas parroquiales de la Arquidiócesis (PRF) en lugar de cuentas de ahorro?

R: Las cuentas de PRF son aceptables si no están combinadas con fondos parroquiales, SVdP tiene acceso exclusivo a los fondos y los fondos son accesibles de inmediato. Este tipo de acuerdos son raros; a menudo, el pastor tiene acceso a fondos. Por lo tanto, estas cuentas deben ser examinadas con gran escrutinio y respaldadas con documentación sólida.

Council Responsibilities to The Society

Council Responsibilities to The Society 1200 628 Jill Pioter

Two documents on the National Council website — What Is Expected of an Archdiocesan/Diocesan Council and What Is Expected of a District Council — clearly explain what a Council should be doing. A few key reminders are listed below. As part of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, the Council will:

  • Accept and strive to achieve our stated missions.
  • Operate within the Rule, Manual, Nationally Approved Bylaws, and Resolutions of the Society.
  • Report annually on a timely basis on its activities and results.
  • Take part in the larger Society by attendance at meetings and participating in Regional or National Committees when asked to do so.
  • Share all best practices, processes, or procedures with other Councils whenever possible.
  • Actively promote training and formation of its members.
  • Develop a program of extending our work to those parishes within our Diocese that have no Conference.
  • Do everything possible to strengthen the spiritual life of its members.

We thought focusing attention on these expectations at the start of a new fiscal year would be helpful.

In addition to the documents linked above, another useful areas of the website that’s worth checking out is: https://members.ssvpusa.org/information-for-members/standards-of-excellence/.

Owners and Stakeholders – Part Two

Owners and Stakeholders – Part Two 1200 628 Jill Pioter

Last week we discussed five groups of people who should be considered stakeholders in what we do as Vincentians. Here are five additional groups:

  • Collaborative Nonprofit Organizations
  • Governmental Entities
  • The Community At Large
  • The Local Bishop (in the case of all Catholic organizations)
  • Pastors and Clergy (in the case of any Catholic organization supported by a parish)

Other nonprofit organizations are stakeholders. We all share a common goal to some degree. All nonprofits influence other nonprofit organizations in their community. Especially important are those nonprofits that we partner with. If the Society does something to damage its reputation, then those that collaborate with it also may suffer collateral damage.

Every nonprofit needs other nonprofits to accomplish larger projects. With diversity of missions nonprofits can share the overall needs of those served by sharing our strengths with each other. For example, a person may need shelter that is provided by another nonprofit while the same person also needs clothing or food that is available from our Society.

The city, county, state and federal governments are additional stakeholders. Nonprofits and their volunteers are significant contributors to the support of the responsibilities of all these governmental entities. If federal and state governments did not allow donations to nonprofits to be tax-deductible, much of our work would be impossible to fund. If nonprofit organizations did not exist, it would be left up to the governing bodies to provide necessary services to the public. Government agencies are very interested in what is done, how it is done, and the level of effectiveness and efficiency with which it is accomplished. They are also responsible to ensure that all laws are followed and that services provided do no harm to those who are served.

The entire community is a stakeholder. It has an interest in how those in need are served. The overall community and its image are improved when the disadvantaged are taken care of. The community is then thought of as a better place to live, raise children and experience a better quality of life. Where the care of those in need is provided by nonprofits, the taxes necessary for broader social services are lessened.

Residents of the community often consider themselves “owners” of our Society. Because the people of the community see our work, some become donors, some volunteer and some know of someone who was served. Most agree with our work and readily identify with what we do
even though they may not be directly involved. They may simply know that the Society of St. Vincent de Paul is in their community and helping the poor. That knowledge is important to them.

The finances of the nonprofit corporation are also more important to a wider community than the finances of a for-profit. Everyone who contributes in some way, who receives services, or who simply knows about its work consider themselves an owner or stakeholder. There is a perceived level of stewardship by the community. They expect the nonprofit to be run efficiently and that the money donated or granted to it goes toward intended programs. In fact, many people believe that nonprofit organizations should have plain, inexpensive offices and equipment. To them it is an indication that most of the donations are given to the poor and not to the people running the nonprofit. The people of the community will not tolerate what they consider to be excessive salaries. In their eyes a nonprofit employee is really a dedicated volunteer and does the work because of a love of the mission and not for a well-paid job. For many employees that is a reality.

In our Society we recognize the need to maximize the amount of our donations that goes directly to those in need. But that maximization cannot come at the expense of our employees who deserve adequate wages. The Society’s Voice of the Poor Committee has developed a policy
about a just wage for our employees. That policy has been approved by the National Council Members.

In the case of Catholic organizations, the local Bishop is responsible for all activities related to the Church in his Diocese. Because our Society is in the Diocese at the pleasure of the Bishop, he is a stakeholder. He allows us to be in the parishes because of our close relationship to the Church and the work we do for Christ’s poor. Because the way we operate directly reflects on the Diocese in the eyes of the community, and because our Society also contributes to the spiritual growth of its members and evangelizes by its members’ actions, the Bishop has great
interest in what we do. He knows that we assist in fulfilling the Church’s preferential option for the poor. This vital relationship requires regular and close attention. Keeping your Bishop informed about the activities and achievements of your Council should be a high priority.

Pastors and Clergy are stakeholders for reasons similar to those of the Bishop. Our presence in the parish helps the pastor and other clergy serve the poor and relieves the parish burden of responding to the needs of people coming to the Church for assistance. Always keep in mind that St. Vincent de Paul serves in the parish with the pastor’s permission.

The source of this article is Governance: Council and Board, the original version of which was authored by former National Vice President Terry Wilson.

Owners and Stakeholders – Part One

Owners and Stakeholders – Part One 1200 628 Jill Pioter

Have you ever considered the audiences you have as a Vincentian and especially as a Vincentian leader? Whether you are a Conference or Council President, a member of a Board of Directors, serve on a Committee or are an active or associate member of a Conference there are a number of people to whom you are accountable, are your audience, or have a stake in what you do and how you do it. We call these people “stakeholders.”

In for-profit companies the finances are mainly of interest to those who own the corporation or those interested in becoming owners. Nonprofit corporations, however, have many “owners,” also known as stakeholders. This week we’ll discuss five of these groups and next week an additional five.

  • Members
  • Those They Serve
  • Donors
  • Volunteers
  • Employees

Let’s talk about these one at a time:

Members

Members are stakeholders. In the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, most Vincentians consider their work to be a vocation. They believe in the mission and have invested heavily with their time, talent, and resources to help achieve it. More than that, it is often their very way of life.

The needs of those served make them stakeholders. For example, our Society’s mission is carried out by supplying people in need with services and goods they require to live a decent life. In many cases our help is the difference between the abject poverty of living on the street or the peace of having a place of their own in which to live.

Our Society’s work goes beyond food, shelter, clothes, furniture, etc. When life circumstances such as illness, job loss or poor decisions fall heavily on a person or family, Vincentians can bring hope, share our spirituality, and provide at least for basic needs.

Donors

Donors make our work possible. They want to be sure their donations are used to achieve the greatest amount of benefits for the program to which they contributed. Even though they know it is not possible, they would like every dollar they give to go directly to those in need.

Donors give of their time and money because they believe in what we do and how we do it. They want to find a way to give to the poor or make a difference in someone’s life. Our Society and the way we operate gives them confidence that their support will achieve their desires to help those in need.

Volunteers

Volunteers are closely aligned with any nonprofit, especially ours. They desire to contribute to those in need and to give back to the community for their own good fortune. They see the Society as a well-run organization that knows how to reach those in need and assist them. It is not uncommon that a volunteer will eventually become a member.

Employees

Employees work for any corporation or business to provide for their own needs. In our Society they become our partners in our mission. More than that, they become believers in our work and who we are. We expect them to present themselves to those we serve and the public in the same way a member does. They are often so involved that you find it hard to separate them from our Vincentian members.

They are true stakeholders because they both support and foster the mission and because they need to earn a living. Some may even be willing to continue to work for less than they can earn elsewhere. The Society has a responsibility to pay a living wage and provide necessary benefits. All members of the Society must ask: How can we live out our mission to help others if our own employees are underpaid?

The source of this article is Governance: Council and Board, the original version of which was authored by former National Vice President Terry Wilson.

Benefits of National Solidarity

Benefits of National Solidarity 1200 628 Jill Pioter

The Benefits of National Solidarity
(Services Subsidized by the Operating Budget)

Conference & Council Support
  • Fundraising
    > Fund Development Training
    > National Friends of the Poor® Walk/Run
    > National Friends of the Poor® Grants
    > National Vehicle Donation Program
    > Assistance with Major Gift Solicitation
    > Planned Giving Tool Box
    > Accessible Development Resources
    > Corporate Giving Program Template
    > National Meetings Fundraising Program
    > Individual Development Consultation
    > Domestic/International Disaster Relief
    > Online Giving Program
    > Coordination of Major Gifts
    > Building Endowment Fund
  • Youth and Young Adult Support
  • Information Technology Services and Support
  • Financial Advice
  • Meeting Management
  • Thrift Store Consultation
  • SVdP Housing Program Information
  • Support for New Councils and Conferences
  • Aggregation and Institution Process
  • New Member Recruitment: Invitation to Serve
  • Best Practices: Identification, Publication and Promotion
  • Publications, Handbooks and Forms (many available in Spanish)
  • Governance: Training/Accountability/Compliance with the Rule, Bylaws, Policies, Procedures and Laws
  • Licensed Trademark Protection of our name
  • Problem Solving (Governance, Ethical, Legal, Spiritual and Technical)=
Communications/Public Relations
  • Media Outreach and Promotion
  • Editorial and Public Relations Support
  • Frederic’s E-Gazette (includes SVdP in the News)
  • Logo and Graphics Branding
  • The Society DVD
  • National Websites
    > Public
    > Members
    > Youth and Young Adults
    > Haiti
    > National Vehicle Donation Program
    > Friends of the Poor®
    > Development
    > Membership Database and Tutorial
    > National Stores
Vincentian Spiritual Formation
  • Serving in Hope
  • Vincentian Reflections
  • Ozanam Orientation
  • Retreats and Workshops
    > National Meetings
    > Midyear Meetings
    > Regional Meetings
  • Invitation for Renewal Leadership Program
  • Vincentian Servant Leadership Pathways
  • Vincentian Celebrations Notebook
  • Spiritual Advisors
    > Training
    > Handbook
  • Formators
    > Training
  • Heritage Pilgrimage to Paris
  • Formation and Training Materials
  • SVdP Resources
Advocacy Support
  • Voice of the Poor Resources
  • Immersion Re-entry Program
  • Legislative Update
  • Poverty in America DVD
  • Maintaining Relationships with Elected Officials
Management of the National Council
  • National Office Administration
    > Accounting
    > Payroll
    > Accounts Receivable/Payable
    > Human Resources: Resources, Records, Benefits
    > Building and Equipment
  • Professional and Staff Support for National Committees
  • Professional and Staff Support for National Officers
  • Meeting Management (National, Midyear, Regional, National Board
  • Development for National Council
    > Annual Giving
    > Programmatic Solicitations
    > Online Giving
    > Planned and Major Gifts
    > Foundation Solicitation
    > Corporate Sponsorships
    > Consultation and Collaboration With Other SVdP Fundraisers
  • Strategic Plan Implementation
    > I. Expand and strengthen our network of friends
    > II. Encourage and support Vincentians on their spiritual journey
    > III. Advocate for and work towards a more just world
    > IV. Promote deeper and meaningful relationships with those we serve
    > V. Develop, improve, and expand services
  • Episcopal Advisor Relationships
  • Management and Disbursement of Domestic and International Disaster Funds
  • IRS Nonprofit Group Exemption
  • National Group Insurance
  • Domestic and International Twinning (Solidarity With the World’s Poor)
  • Consolidation and Preparation of Annual Report
  • Coordination of National Election
  • Collection/Disbursement of International, National and Regional Solidarity Dues
  • Conflict Resolution Team for Councils and Conferences
  • Maintain National Archives
Maintaining Relationships With
  • International Council and Vincentian Family
  • U.S. Bishops
  • Catholic Charities
  • Campaign for Human Development
  • Catholic Relief Services
  • Catholic Health Association

What Makes a Good Board Member?

What Makes a Good Board Member? 1200 628 Jill Pioter

It’s important to know what is involved in being a good Board member.

BoardSource, considered the premier voice of nonprofit governance, notes that “While all effective Board members understand and meet their basic responsibilities, truly exceptional Board members do more. They go beyond the basics and pay attention to how they approach Board service. These six characteristics build on straightforward Board duties and focus on key traits of exceptional Board members.”

Click here to read the BoardSource article which explains each characteristic.

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